FRENCH POSTCARDS

Byron Lacy

FRENCH POSTCARDS is perfect for fans of French House, Deep House, Vaporwave, Synthwave, and the larger Dance/Electronica community as a whole. Great for building a chill atmosphere for a party, progressive club, or simply at home, the track will also be an excellent addition for genre and aesthetic driven playlists. All set to find a good home in stylistically relevant dance studios, the song could also be an intriguing background for a variety of visual and performance based art, with the possibility of use for a film or videogame soundtrack, given an appropriate match.

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Intruder/ Mantis Creature

Intergalactic Overdrive

Byron Lacy

A hybrid of EDM, Trap, Dubstep, and classical music all rolled into one, providing new musical impressions for the mind by a "Mad Scientist" of musical construction.

Byron’s music doesn’t fit into one category. It is a hybrid of EDM, Trap, Dubstep, and classical music all rolled into one. People listen to it and say “Yea that’s EDM (or Trap or Dub Step), but it’s different”. Byron thinks that electronic music is the classical music of the future. In the 80’s Byron was introduced to electronic music. His favorite musicians were The Cars, Gary Newman, and Brian Eno. He discovered Trap music only a couple of years ago, and his favorites are Martin Garrix, Milo and Otis, and A-Track. The biggest influence on Byron’s music is music from extraterrestrial beings. He heard their music several times because he is an Alien contactee. In 2009 Byron discovered that he was an alien abductee and upset his entire life for a time, because he discovered there was “something under the bed and in the closet”; it turned out to be ET’s rather than monsters.

Art had been his main creative outlet and he had achieved a great deal of success with galleries and museum shows. He loved art because he could be creative and free spirited. In 2009 art lost its luster for him and he even complained a few times that making art made him feel drained and ill, rather than energized as it had made him feel for years. He felt there was need for a change and threw his efforts into writing, and wrote three books. It was also at this time that he started learning the bass guitar with instructions from a musician (now deceased) named Jimmy Daniels. Jimmy introduced him to some local musicians and bands, and he would sing or three songs with them during their performances. He was singing Country Music with these bands, and he said “after I got where I could make a mistake, and just keep going as if nothing had happened, and it not affecting me I felt like I had accomplished what I needed to.” Meditation has always been important to Byron and in 1997 he had the first experience of hearing music that seemed other worldly and strangely beautiful. It was 2011 when he heard “very strange and beautiful which was not on the CD I was listening to.” Then in 2015 Byron heard “Out the Speakers by Milo and Otis with A-Track, and a year later he bought a synthesizer and started to experiment. He did not know how to play a keyboard, or read music, but he could play intuitively where it sounded like he knew how to play. Byron is poised to release two new albums, and works on recording new songs almost every day. To him making music is like making art or building a house. He treats sounds as objects and constructs his songs. He goes into the studio with no preconceived notion about what he will do. He picks his drums and records them, and then starts to play intuitively. It’s a lot like the action artists of the 50’s, however instead of slinging paint he is slinging music. Music that does something to the listener is his goal. One of his listeners’ said this on Amazon about his second album Learning to Live With Rockets; “This album is fantastic! When I'm feeling stressed, tired, happy, or energetic, it's perfect. That being said, the songs are exactly what you need at any given time! You can tell the artist puts his heart and soul into creating these tracks. Only someone that feels deeply and is connected to the universe could make music that lifts you to a higher place. I look forward to anything else Byron creates!

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Trap House

Byron Lacy

Byron’s music doesn’t fit into one category, It is a hybrid of EDM, Trap, Dubstep, and classical music all rolled into one.

Byron’s music doesn’t fit into one category. It is a hybrid of EDM, Trap, Dubstep, and classical music all rolled into one. People listen to it and say “Yea that’s EDM (or Trap or Dub Step), but it’s different”. Byron thinks that electronic music is the classical music of the future.
In the 80’s Byron was introduced to electronic music. His favorite musicians were The Cars, Gary Newman, and Brian Eno. He discovered Trap music only a couple of years ago, and his favorites are Martin Garrix, Milo and Otis, and A-Track. The biggest influence on Byron’s music is music from extraterrestrial beings. He heard their music several times because he is an Alien contactee. In 2009 Byron discovered that he was an alien abductee and upset his entire life for a time, because he discovered there was “something under the bed and in the closet”; it turned out to be ET’s rather than monsters. Art had been his main creative outlet and he had achieved a great deal of success with galleries and museum shows. He loved art because he could be creative and free spirited. In 2009 art lost its luster for him and he even complained a few times that making art made him feel drained and ill, rather than energized as it had made him feel for years. He felt there was need for a change and threw his efforts into writing, and wrote three books. It was also at this time that he started learning the bass guitar with instructions from a musician (now deceased) named Jimmy Daniels. Jimmy introduced him to some local musicians and bands, and he would sing or three songs with them during their performances. He was singing Country Music with these bands, and he said “after I got where I could make a mistake, and just keep going as if nothing had happened, and it not affecting me I felt like I had accomplished what I needed to.” Meditation has always been important to Byron and in 1997 he had the first experience of hearing music that seemed other worldly and strangely beautiful. It was 2011 when he heard “very strange and beautiful which was not on the CD I was listening to.” Then in 2015 Byron heard “Out the Speakers by Milo and Otis with A-Track, and a year later he bought a synthesizer and started to experiment. He did not know how to play a keyboard, or read music, but he could play intuitively where it sounded like he knew how to play. Byron works on recording new songs almost every day. To him making music is like making art or building a house. He treats sounds as objects and constructs his songs. He goes into the studio with no preconceived notion about what he will do. He picks his drums and records them, and then starts to play intuitively. It’s a lot like the action artists of the 50’s, however instead of slinging paint he is slinging music. Music that does something to the listener is his goal. One of his listeners’ said this on Amazon about his second album Learning to Live With Rockets; “This album is fantastic! When I'm feeling stressed, tired, happy, or energetic, it's perfect. That being said, the songs are exactly what you need at any given time! You can tell the artist puts his heart and soul into creating these tracks. Only someone that feels deeply and is connected to the universe could make music that lifts you to a higher place. I look forward to anything else Byron creates!

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Saturn Fish

Byron Lacy

What I love about electronic music is you can control everything about a single note. Resonance, attack, decay, sustain, release: this makes each note as important as the entire song. All songs are performed on synths, no loops. Exploration.

Music is a food of impressions. I want to provide new impressions, so I want my music to be different. Sometimes I will use something that is more of a noise than musical notes, to achieve the same purpose the notes would fill, such as moving the melody line up or down. From time to time I will also use percussion sounds and purposely make them out of sync with the rhythm of the song. I have found that when this is done the percussion/drums have to be listened to for their sound, not for the qualities of keeping rhythm. Some of the things I do are often construed as mistakes by mainstream music professionals, but some people actually get what I am doing, and they love it. My music has many of the properties of a Jazz performance. I am a musical explorer. I try to find unusual tonal combinations, and to play phrases in a different way. I never know what I am going to do when I go in the studio. I pick out my drums first and lay down the rhythm track, and then everything grows from that. The rhythm track adds order to the song, and this allows me to be as free with the rest of the instrumentation as I want to be. I have used two different rhythm tracks in a song, at the same time, to create an unusual effect. The entire song will follow one rhythm track, while the other track is used as a sort of sound effect. I try and discover what music is, and what it can be.
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Learning to Live with Rockets

Byron Lacy

These songs are a hybrid of Trap, Dubstep, Noise, Rock, EDM, Trance, Art Music, and Classical; all combined into something new and original. For those looking for something familiar and different, both at the same time.

I am 66 years old, and I work in the fields of art, music, and writing. I have had exhibitions of my art in galleries and museums throughout the United States. I have three books now on Amazon and B&N as well as a few independent book stores. My nonfiction book, Chosen: Chronicles of an Alien Abductee covers my experiences of over fifty years in being visited and experimented on, by alien beings. One of the sources of inspiration for my music has been alien music which I heard during meditation.

I am a fourth generation Texan, and a fourth generation abductee. My Great Grandfather, George W. Lacy, came to Texas from Ireland in the 1850’s. He and his two business partners donated the granite to build the state capitol in Austin Texas. He and his brothers started a dog breed, the Bluer Lacy, which is now the state dog of Texas.

I was in a band in high school, and after we worked for over a year and learned over a hundred songs, played our first gig, and then broke up over power issues in the band. I was in another band in 1981 and the same thing happened. But in 1981 I bought my first synthesizer, actually it was for my wife at that time, but I would jam on it, just playing notes and pretend chords, but with feeling. I didn’t know how to play keyboard. The other band members were surprised that they really liked what I did. They said it had the look and feel of a song, sounded like a song, but at the same time, it was just sounds made with purpose.

  1. Loving music, synthesizers, and just the sheer act of creating; these are the things which inspire me. I never really know what is going to happen until I start the process of recording. I do not come up with an idea before I start, and usually the title of the song comes to me while I am editing the song. This song started out as “UFO in the shadow of the sun” but as I worked on the song it ended up as “Visitors from Zeta Reticuli”.

  2. The writing and recording process. I have no preconceived notions when I go into my studio. I always start out with the drum track, that way everything I play will be at the same speed and rhythm. The first drum track may be discarded, or altered, as the song evolves, and most of my drum tracks have been drastically changed as the song is nearing completion. The song sort of grows as time goes on. It takes me 40 to 46 hours to complete the song, and usually by this point I have listened to it over a hundred times. After I complete the drum track I pick which synthesizer I will use, and the first voice I will use. I go through a lot of voices until one just grabs me, and that’s the one I start with.

Then I start playing, and recording, just letting my fingers move over the keys where they feel like going, until some small phrase catches my attention, and then I focus in and start working on it until I have developed the melody line. I can feel where a set of notes are often headed, and at some point I will take them in a different direction. I think most of us can finish a musical phrase in our heads when listening to a song, and we know where it is headed. I try and take it in a different direction to surprise the listener.

I am all about building up tension in the listener, and then relieving it. I will repeat a phrase, or even as single note, to the limit of tolerance, and then before the listener gets board or tired of the sound I will throw in something different, even if it is just a noise, and it suddenly becomes fresh again. I am not above replacing part of a phrase with an abstract sound that does what notes would do, like carry the phrase downward to a lower note.

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We Are Not Alone

Byron Lacy

Byron Lacy/Alien Abductee's music is dynamic and uplifting, and provides new musical impressions to feed upon. The music is inspired by Trap Music, and also Alien music heard by the artist during an abduction experiance.

Aliens have abducted me since 1955, when I was five years old. You can Google my name and will find internet radio interviews about me and my experiances. Many of them have been very strange by human standards, including them saving my life eight or more times. It was one of my experiances, in November of 2011, which led to me working with synthesizers and recording music. I meditate to a CD with an entrainment track hidden under random sounds and it puts you in a deep trance. I was also concentrating on one tone in my tinnitus (which I have had all of my life) which was, for some reason, a lot louder than all the rest of the tones. I have used this CD for 5 years. I know the CD fairly well, but because the music on it is all random, after all of these years I still do not know exactly what will come next. However I was familiar with the CD enough to realize that what was playing was something completely different from the usual. I was proud of myself because I wasn't naive about what was going on this time. It was the alins. I wasn't even in a deep trance yet and the music was like what it would sound if an orchestra and synthesizers were playing ordered mathematically correct music, yet it was all random music at the same time, so this was beautiful abstract music; no melody, no repetition of any phrase, but still beautiful and so complex. I really don't do it service. There were all the instruments and all the sections of an orchestra, which are NOT on the CD which is all computer synthesizer sounds, which was not what I was hearing.

I knew I was also "supposed" to listen to the tinnitus waveform in my head, so I did. It is really amazing to me how they can let me know they want me to do something without talking to me directly. Then I wasn't aware of my breath, my heart, my body, no phosphines in my vision, NOTHING. I felt disembodied. It didn’t start out as a light trance and then progress to a deeper trance. I went from no meditative state to complete disassociation with my brain/body. I started to feel a surge of claustrophobia rising in me but I managed to dispose of it. I figured I was not really trapped because I had chosen to meditate and I was determined to see what would happen next. Immediately, the music got more intense and then it faded into a voice chanting. The voice was like nothing I had ever heard before and neither were the words. It was very deep and sounded as if it came from something shaped like a very large being, an elephant, Buddha, and a giant beetle all rolled into one. It seemed to be of a dark color and was very textured. I could not see it but those were the impressions that flooded through my consciousness. The voice was deep and it sounded like a computer voice in some ways, but wasn't. It was raspy, yet very strong and it seemed to actually occupy space. It was not pleasant or unpleasant and not benevolent or malevolent sounding, but very focused. It also had qualities of a didgeridoo, especially the way that instrument’s start and end sounds. The words I had never heard and do not know what they meant. They did NOT sound like nonsense. No earthly accent. It made me go deeper. I felt as if I was a NON-MOVING explosion of light; an explosion that was not exploding. Then I felt my solar plexus and it seemed someone was fiddling with some controls there which were probably inducing the trance. I think I was experiencing my energy body or the astral body. Then it was all gone. I was in my bed, the CD was back to normal, and I felt great. I was definitely stunned and in awe of the entire experience. My music does have a heavy rythem line which the alien music did not have, but I felt it gave the songs more structure, and saved them from being just randon sounds. I also love Trap music and Dub Step, and these along with my memory of the alien music, have been the most major influences on my songs.

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